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Here’s the first of our GotY videos. I love our video editor.

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VG247 news work

I am trying very hard not to think about certain things right now so I’m thinking about work instead.

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Viking development - Edge Magazine

I strongly agree that the games industry can and should do more, at a very basic level beyond recruiting, to promote gender equality in the workplace - as a first step on the road to, or concurrent with a push for, true diversity, which goes beyond men and women.

But I mislike the suggestion that the culture Hocking identifies in his piece as negative is solely the province of men. It suggests that men can’t be better than that; it suggests women are intrinsically better.

I don’t think this is what Hocking meant to imply; phrases like “better-balanced” suggest he simply wants to end one group’s dominance, rather than promoting the idea that there are two distinct cultures with different levels of value.

But there is a dangerous inference for the casual reader that men and women are fundamentally different, and that women are better.

In my report on this piece, I am guilty of editorialising. I tried to preserve the positive message I found in Hocking’s piece - that diversity and equality are things worth pushing for if we want better games - while glossing over the foregrounding of women’s role in this revolution. By doing this I’ve no doubt done us out of a number of page impressions from the flame war that would have resulted in the comments thread.

I feel bad about highlighting my own interpretation in my article, and silly for feeling bad, and I wonder if I’ll be accused of anti-feminism for not putting my own gender on a pedestal and vilifying another when I had a perfectly justifiable chance.

I’d really appreciate feedback and a discussion on this.

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Retraction

I caught some shit about my last text post, where I said something detracting about games journalism as a career.

I wouldn’t swap it for anything in the world. Got it? Nothing. It is utterly delightful.

My comments were born of frustration at those who seem to believe games journalism is not a job you have to work for/at.

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Friends

Logged into the site to cover a shift today and found this:

Front page

Clicked through to:

Article

I think it’s pretty safe to say the awesome best friending goes in both directions. Boyfriend, I heart you.

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It’s true, I am an outrageous pedant furiously addicted to the ways of the past. And my colleagues spend too much time in PhotoShop.

It’s true, I am an outrageous pedant furiously addicted to the ways of the past. And my colleagues spend too much time in PhotoShop.

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Is Little Big Planet 2 one of the most gorgeous things in the world, ever? Yes, I believe it may be.
via games.on.net

Is Little Big Planet 2 one of the most gorgeous things in the world, ever? Yes, I believe it may be.

via games.on.net

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Self-promotion (again!) (sorry)

I didn’t mean for this Tumblr to be all about promoting my work, but I’ve had a bit of a run lately. Highly unusual. Also, I spent all day locked away so tightly with my muse that I did not encounter anything worth posting. I apologise.

But now… self promotion!

Here’s an interview I did with Ed Stern of Splash Damage.

Here’s my preview of Brink, the game we discussed.

And here’s a screenshot because again with the lovely. Don’t tell Id I think this one is lovelier <3

Brink @ Games.On.Net

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Games On Net :: New Releases: Bethesdays Preview: Rage

I saw Rage, too. I really had a good time!

Rage @ Games.On.Net

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Games On Net :: New Releases: Bethesdays Preview: Fallout: New Vegas

Yeah, I totally went to Chantilly and previewed a bunch of ace Bethesda titles, then wrote things down about them. That is a thing we games journalists do.

Fallout: New Vegas @ Games.On.Net

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Games On Net :: Reviews: 2 Minute Review: Nier (PS3)

Occasionally I write reviews, and I appreciate it when you look at them.

Nier @ Games.On.Net

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"The thing is, I really like saying yes. I like new things, projects, plans, getting people together and doing something, trying something, even when it’s corny or stupid. I am not good at saying no. And I do not get along with people who say no. When you die, and it really could be this afternoon, under the same bus wheels I’ll stick my head if need be, you will not be happy about having said no. You will be kicking your ass about all the no’s you’ve said. No to that opportunity, or no to that trip to Nova Scotia or no to that night out, or no to that project or no to that person who wants to be naked with you but you worry about what your friends will say.

No is for wimps. No is for pussies. No is to live small and embittered, cherishing the opportunities you missed because they might have sent the wrong message.

There is a point in one’s life when one cares about selling out and not selling out. One worries whether or not wearing a certain shirt means that they are behind the curve or ahead of it, or that having certain music in one’s collection means that they are impressive, or unimpressive.

Thankfully, for some, this all passes. I am here to tell you that I have, a few years ago, found my way out of that thicket of comparison and relentless suspicion and judgment. And it is a nice feeling. Because, in the end, no one will ever give a shit who has kept shit ‘real’ except the two or three people, sitting in their apartments, bitter and self-devouring, who take it upon themselves to wonder about such things. The keeping real of shit matters to some people, but it does not matter to me. It’s fashion, and I don’t like fashion, because fashion does not matter.

What matters is that you do good work. What matters is that you produce things that are true and will stand. What matters is that the Flaming Lips’s new album is ravishing and I’ve listened to it a thousand times already, sometimes for days on end, and it enriches me and makes me want to save people. What matters is that it will stand forever, long after any narrow-hearted curmudgeons have forgotten their appearance on goddamn 90210. What matters is not the perception, nor the fashion, not who’s up and who’s down, but what someone has done and if they meant it. What matters is that you want to see and make and do, on as grand a scale as you want, regardless of what the tiny voices of tiny people say. Do not be critics, you people, I beg you. I was a critic and I wish I could take it all back because it came from a smelly and ignorant place in me, and spoke with a voice that was all rage and envy. Do not dismiss a book until you have written one, and do not dismiss a movie until you have made one, and do not dismiss a person until you have met them. It is a fuckload of work to be open-minded and generous and understanding and forgiving and accepting, but Christ, that is what matters. What matters is saying yes.”

Dave Eggers on selling out - originally published in The Harvard Advocate. Via Matt Boyd.

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